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Pbm: Prophet Like Moses?, A

Havilah Dharamraj

Paperback

Authentic Media's Price: £24.99

Price: £24.99


Product Details
Physical Properties
  • Dimensions: 17 x 152 x 229 mm
  • Weight: 0.431kg
  • Pages: 230

Description

In evaluating Elijah as a prophet after the Mosaic paradigm, Dr Havilah Dharamraj proposes a radically different schema for interpreting what is one of the most dramatic and difficult texts in the Old Testament, namely, the earthquake-wind-and-fire theophany at Horeb (1 Kings 19).

Since rabbinic times, the resonance between the Moses stories and the Elijah stories has been regularly noted. Taking into account that Deut. 18:18 promises Israel a 'prophet like Moses', this resonance compels an evaluation of Elijah, holding Moses as the benchmark. Here, scholarship struggles with a paradox. At Horeb Elijah fails in the critical prophetic task of intercession. Yet, his service as prophet is affirmed beyond doubt in his iconic whirlwind-and-chariots-of-fire exit. How are these to be reconciled? Is Elijah a prophet of Mosaic fibre or not? This work offers a strikingly different approach to the Elijah stories. Dharamraj employs the narrative critical method to offer a close reading of the text. Such an approach opens up intriguing possibilities in interpretation. Here, her analysis of the dramatic and difficult discourse of the earthquake-wind-fire- 'still, small voice' theophany at Horeb is notable. So also, is the case she carefully builds for whether Elijah emerges as the hoped-for 'prophet like Moses'.
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Extra Descriptions

In evaluating Elijah as a prophet after the Mosaic paradigm, Dr Havilah Dharamraj proposes a radically different schema for interpreting what is one of the most dramatic and difficult texts in the Old Testament, namely, the earthquake-wind-and-fire theophany at Horeb (1 Kings 19).

Since rabbinic times, the resonance between the Moses stories and the Elijah stories has been regularly noted. Taking into account that Deut. 18:18 promises Israel a 'prophet like Moses', this resonance compels an evaluation of Elijah, holding Moses as the benchmark. Here, scholarship struggles with a paradox. At Horeb Elijah fails in the critical prophetic task of intercession. Yet, his service as prophet is affirmed beyond doubt in his iconic whirlwind-and-chariots-of-fire exit. How are these to be reconciled? Is Elijah a prophet of Mosaic fibre or not? This work offers a strikingly different approach to the Elijah stories. Dharamraj employs the narrative critical method to offer a close reading of the text. Such an approach opens up intriguing possibilities in interpretation. Here, her analysis of the dramatic and difficult discourse of the earthquake-wind-fire- 'still, small voice' theophany at Horeb is notable. So also, is the case she carefully builds for whether Elijah emerges as the hoped-for 'prophet like Moses'.
- Publisher.
[Publisher]


In evaluating Elijah as a prophet after the Mosaic paradigm, Dr Havilah Dharamraj proposes a radically different schema for interpreting what is one of the most dramatic and difficult texts in the Old Testament, namely, the earthquake-wind-and-fire theophany at Horeb (1 Kings 19).

Since rabbinic times, the resonance between the Moses stories and the Elijah stories has been regularly noted. Taking into account that Deut. 18:18 promises Israel a 'prophet like Moses', this resonance compels an evaluation of Elijah, holding Moses as the benchmark. Here, scholarship struggles with a paradox. At Horeb Elijah fails in the critical prophetic task of intercession. Yet, his service as prophet is affirmed beyond doubt in his iconic whirlwind-and-chariots-of-fire exit. How are these to be reconciled? Is Elijah a prophet of Mosaic fibre or not? This work offers a strikingly different approach to the Elijah stories. Dharamraj employs the narrative critical method to offer a close reading of the text. Such an approach opens up intriguing possibilities in interpretation. Here, her analysis of the dramatic and difficult discourse of the earthquake-wind-fire- 'still, small voice' theophany at Horeb is notable. So also, is the case she carefully builds for whether Elijah emerges as the hoped-for 'prophet like Moses'.

[Publisher]